orisha gods and goddesses pdf

Orisha gods and goddesses pdf

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Published: 13.05.2021

Yemaya Symbols

Who Are the Orishas?

Obatala - The Sweetest God from Africa

Yemaya Orisha

Yemaya Symbols

Like Greek, Middle Eastern, and Indian mythologies, the West African mythology offers a sophisticated understanding of creation and humanity. The African mythology, rich in artistic fables and truth stories, offers a pantheon of gods and goddesses. Like Indian Brahma, Olorun also known as Olodumare or Olofi is the creator god who crafted the universe. Like Middle Eastern Baal, Chango is the god of thunder and storm. Like Greek Aphrodite, Oshun is the goddess of beauty, love, and sexual ecstasy. A river in Nigeria is named Oshun that flows into Lagos Lagoon. Obatala, Child of God.

Who Are the Orishas?

Based on a Santerian story. Special thanks to Lesley Murdoch for her insights to Afro-Caribbean religions. The Orisha are gods that came originally from Nigeria, in West Africa, as part of the Yoruba religion. The gods travelled with African people who were stolen as slaves from Africa and brought to North and Central America. Today, a religion named Santeria is based on these gods and is practiced in Cuba, Brazil, and parts of Central America. We also have practitioners here in the United States. Though stories about the Orisha may not mean the same to us as they do to Santerians, we can find great wisdom in them and we are thankful for being allowed to share them.


The religion comprises certain African tribal beliefs. According to John Mason, author of Black Gods: Orisa Studies in the New World, adherents do not believe in.


Obatala - The Sweetest God from Africa

Yemaya Orisha It features 6 tracks in about 40mins. Follower of the Orisha sea goddess Yemaya, of the Yoruba religion, gives offerings at Havana's harbour during the Yemaya Day celebrations in Cuba, on Followers of the Virgin of Regla carry her image during a procession in Havana during the Yemaya Day celebrations in Cuba, on September 7, The Sea Goddess of the Yoruban mythology. She is among the most powerful and beloved of the Seven African Powers, the sexy matriarch of the Yoruba spirits known as orishas.

Orisha Yemaya gives children to the barren and offers support to those who worship her. Yemaya - Goddess of the Sea. According to legend, Yemaya's first gift to her beloved humans was a sea shell in which her voice could always be heard. Love spell products consecrated on the point of Voodoo Lwa Erzulie Freda.

More and more people are being drawn to their pre-Christian ancestral ways. Learn about the Seven African Powers and how you can begin working with them in African spirituality and folk magic. The Orishas are a group of spirits originating from Yorubaland, which is a region in Africa spanning Nigeria, Benin and Togo.

From Eshu to Obatala: animals used in sacrificial rituals at Candomblé

Metrics details. The practice of sacrifice has occurred in several cultures and religions throughout history and still exists today. The present work aims to document the use of animal species in these sacrificial practices in the cities of Caruaru PE and Campina Grande PB in Norteastern Brazil, and to further understand the symbolism of these rituals.

Yemaya Orisha

This provocative question means a great deal to many people around the world who practice a religion known as Santera, or alternatively some people mind the previous name , La Regla de Ocha. This tradition originates among the Yoruba people of West Africa, in the area of present-day Nigeria. A great percentage of the slaves who were brought to the New World were Yoruban according to David Brown of Emory University, , Africans were taken into Cuba between and , and one third were Yoruban or from Yoruban-influenced areas.

For the people of Yoruba, Eshu the trickster is an unscrupulous and sly prankster. In this section are descriptions of African Mythology and mythological beings described in the encyclopedia. This new section is being constructed. Use the oil to anoint doorways, wallets, candles, your car, and your body to invoke their blessings and protection.

By Lilith Dorsey. Throughout Africa and beyond in the diaspora caused by the slave trade, the divine feminine was revered in the forms of goddesses like the ancient Nana Buluku, water spirits like Yemaya, Oshun, and Mami Wata, and the warrior Oya.

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