upon westminster bridge summary and analysis pdf

Upon westminster bridge summary and analysis pdf

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William Wordsworth and A Summary of Composed upon Westminster Bridge

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Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802

While William Wordsworth was taken with the glory of nature, that does not mean to say that he was unaware of the beauty offered in other places as well. London, although considerably not natural, has attracted the attentions of several poets, among them Wordsworth. Westminster Bridge is a road and foot traffic bridge stretching over the River Thames, linking Westminster and Lambeth.

William Wordsworth, also known as one of the major poets of the English Romantic Movement in the 19th century, was born in and died in In , already citizen inhabited London and an upward tendency prevailed inhabitants in [1]. In comparison, other cities like Norwich had almost tiny populations London, however, set the tone for nearly everything — fashion, worn in London, was imitated in other provincial towns.

William Wordsworth and A Summary of Composed upon Westminster Bridge

William Wordsworth, also known as one of the major poets of the English Romantic Movement in the 19th century, was born in and died in In , already citizen inhabited London and an upward tendency prevailed inhabitants in [1]. In comparison, other cities like Norwich had almost tiny populations London, however, set the tone for nearly everything — fashion, worn in London, was imitated in other provincial towns.

The city became a metropolis and a place of consumption. According to industrial production the city was covered by fog nearly everyday. Streets and other public places were noisy and dirty and a terrible smell, like in Paris at that time, must have filled the air. People there were always busy with themselves and in hectic pace — nobody had enough time to enjoy nature or something like that. According to this fact, many people neglected their religious belief and some of them might even have lost their belief in God.

That might be the point Wordsworth had seen and thus he mentally digested it in his sonnet. He probably wanted to make people aware that there is something more than the big-city life which is connected with hard work for the lower classes and a life of decadence the upper classes enjoyed.

As typical for a sonnet, it consists of fourteen verses, which can be divided, in other words arranged, into four parts — there are three quatrains and one final couplet. The rhyme scheme is adapted to the form of the sonnet which leads to the rhyme pattern abba abba cdcdcd. The last striking point about the structure of the poem is the occurrence of many punctuation marks which slow down the speed of the sonnet while reading it.

Therefore the reader has the possibility is rather forced to read and understand the poem in a closer sense and finally is able to enjoy it to the full. The first quatrain deals with the description of the appeal of beauty which can be recognized by looking around while standing on the bridge. The speaker of the poem declares the view as most impressive — the earth is not able to show people something fairer than the view from Westminster Bridge, so it is a kind of uniqueness which is shown here.

This position is supported by the second verse which tells that anybody who is attracted by the view cannot evade, only if this person probably has a deaf character. The comparison made in the fourth verse is very interesting — the city wears the beauty of the morning like a garment. This fact implies that the beauty of the morning is something temporal in the city. A garment is a piece of cloth which can be worn but taken off as well.

Consequently the beauty can only be regarded in the morning or rather the morning represents the beauty. When the day continues, the beauty vanishes, just because the life of the city begins.

In general it is hardly possible to see any of them caused by pollution etc. This kind of natural spectacle must have evoked deep emotions in the speaker of the poem who tells us that he neither saw something like that nor he experienced such a relaxed feeling connected with this sight — the whole trouble of business-like London was absent at this moment and nothing uneasy or stressful remained.

The twelfth verse tells us that the river flows at its own will. In general the Thames would have been dammed up with the intention to use the water power for industries or something like that by the inhabitants of London.

But in the morning the river is free, possesses its own will and is able to glide in every direction, at least so far this would be possible. The last but one verse refers to the already mentioned calmness. The speaker of the sonnet might be a little bit confused by the almost deathly silence and therefore he addresses to God.

It can be regarded as a question to God when the speaker says that even the houses seem to have fallen asleep. It must have been unreal, in other words incomprehensible, to see that London, which was the biggest city on earth at this time, was lying still without a hint of movement.

After having finished with a general view on the sonnet, a more detailed analysis concerning some crucial points will follow now. Add to cart. Table of Contents 1. Introduction 2.

Analysis 3. Summary 4. Bibliography 1. Introduction William Wordsworth, also known as one of the major poets of the English Romantic Movement in the 19th century, was born in and died in Roy Porter [3] Cf. Sign in to write a comment. Read the ebook. Parallel Poetic Perspectives of Londo An Analysis and Interpretation of Wil Representations of London in William William Wordsworth: Lines composed up The Representation of London in Willi William Wordsworth als Sonettdichter.

Das Verhaeltnis des Menschen zur Natu Kindheit in William Wordsworth's Dorothy Wordsworth and her influence William Wordsworth - The Representati The Concept of "Nature" in The longing for transcendence in Will About "The Old Cumberland Beggar Analysis of William Wordsworth's The Comforting Power of an Experience Romanticism and the Child. Publish now - it's free.

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A sonnet is a type of poem written in iambic pentameter and consisting of 14 lines. The Petrarchan variant is Italian and is divided into an octet 8 lines followed by a sestet 6 lines. The octet typically introduces the theme of the poem, whist the sestet provides a resolution. London was by no means exclusively idyllic like Wordsworth describes, with rampant poverty, pollution, overcrowding and disease plaguing the city streets amidst the early phases of the industrial revolution. Earth has not any thing to show more fair:.

Andrew has a keen interest in all aspects of poetry and writes extensively on the subject. His poems are published online and in print. Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, is William Wordsworth's sonnet to the capital city of London, written before the full effects of the industrial revolution had reached the metropolis. Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy were on their way to the port of Dover in July , en route for Paris. Imagine an early dawn, hardly anyone on the streets, when along comes a carriage and horses, stopping temporarily to take in the view over the River Thames. This could be the moment of inspiration for the romantic poet.

Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty:.

When published, the poem appeared alongside sonnets that explicitly criticized industrial England. Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty:. This City now doth, like a garment, wear The beauty of the morning;. Never did sun more beautifully steep In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill;.

Here is the poem, and a few words by way of analysis:. Earth has not anything to show more fair: Dull would he be of soul who could pass by A sight so touching in its majesty: This City now doth, like a garment, wear The beauty of the morning: silent, bare, Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie Open unto the fields, and to the sky; All bright and glittering in the smokeless air. The river glideth at his own sweet will: Dear God!

Analysis of Poem

Wordsworth is clearly captivated by the beauty of this particular London morning. Such magnificent showings do not happen very often, so Wordsworth suggests that a person would be foolish to pass by, assuming that there will be other chances to enjoy stunning moments in time. Thus, the thematic message of the poem is to cherish the wonders of the world because they are ephemeral.

2 comments

  • Guillermina M. 31.05.2021 at 13:49

    The best Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, study guide on the planet. The fastest way to understand the poem's meaning, themes, form.

    Reply
  • Paige J. 02.06.2021 at 15:25

    The poem, 'Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, , is a celebration of this city, referncing the bridge over the River Thames.

    Reply

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