flash and fire point of petrol and diesel pdf

Flash and fire point of petrol and diesel pdf

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What is an Oil's Flash Point?

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What is Diesel Fuel

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What is an Oil's Flash Point?

And, because of its low cost, simplicity and versatility, the test is popular among the used oil analysis community as well. The flash point is the lowest temperature at which the vapor above the oil sample will momentarily ignite or flash when an ignition source is passed over it. The flash point typically degrees C or degrees F for mineral oils is an indication of the safety hazards of a lubricant with respect to fire and explosion. However, the flash point should not be confused with the auto ignition temperature AIT , which is the temperature typically degrees C or to degrees F for mineral oils at which the oil vapor will combust spontaneously without an ignition source. This is an important property of fire-resistant hydraulic fluids in EHC systems on steam turbines. According to ASTM, which first standardized the test in , the flash point is the lowest temperature at which an ignition source causes the vapors of the specimen lubricant to ignite under specified conditions. The oil flashes because a flammable mixture results when it is heated sufficiently, causing vapors to emerge and mix with oxygen in the air.

The flash point of a volatile material is the lowest temperature at which its vapors ignite if given an ignition source. The flash point is sometimes confused with the autoignition temperature , the temperature that causes spontaneous ignition. The fire point is the lowest temperature at which the vapors keep burning after the ignition source is removed. It is higher than the flash point, because at the flash point more vapor may not be produced fast enough to sustain combustion. The flash point is a descriptive characteristic that is used to distinguish between flammable fuels, such as gasoline also known as petrol , and combustible fuels, such as diesel. It is also used to characterize the fire hazards of fuels.

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Historical Version s - view previous versions of standard. Work Item s - proposed revisions of this standard. More D It is only one of a number of properties which must be considered in assessing the overall flammability hazard of a material. One should consult the particular regulation involved for precise definitions of these classifications. However, results of these test methods may be used as elements of a fire risk assessment which takes into account all of the factors which are pertinent to an assessment of the fire hazard of a particular end use.

Autoignition Temperature Defined The lowest temperature at which a heated liquid's vapors in air will selfignite and burn, without exposure to any ignition source. Flash Point and Fire Point Testing The liquid to be tested is heated in a cup and the rising liquid temperature is continuously measured. A small flame is mechanically passed back and forth just above the surface of the liquid. The ignitions repeat as the liquid temperature continues to rise. The observed temperature when the burning becomes continuous is the Fire Point. Autoignition Point Testing Liquid is heated, but without an ignition source.


burn even after the removal of the ignition source. 2. Flash and fire point in engine perspective. Gasoline has a flash point around ⁰ C whereas diesel has.


What is Diesel Fuel

The flash point is a general indication of the flammability or combustibility of a liquid. Below the flash point, insufficient vapour is available to support combustion. At some temperature above the flash point, the liquid will produce enough vapour to support combustion. This temperature is known as the fire point.

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Rodrigo A. Bastos 1. Box , Campinas-SP, Brazil. Methyl ester biodiesels from vegetable oils, including soy, corn, canola and sunflower, and from swine lard, were prepared.

Revision This is a preview of the paper, limited to some initial content. Full access requires DieselNet subscription. Please log in to view the complete version of this paper.

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