lost islamic history book pdf download

Lost islamic history book pdf download

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Lost Islamic History: Reclaiming Muslim Civilisation from the Past

Lost Islamic History pdf

Lost Islamic History Books

Islam has been one of the most powerful religious, social, and political forces in history.

Lost Islamic History: Reclaiming Muslim Civilisation from the Past

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Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Islam has been one of the most powerful religious, social and political forces in history. Over the last years, from origins in Arabia, a succession of Muslim polities and later empires expanded to control territories and peoples that ultimately stretched from southern France to East Africa and South East Asia.

Yet many of the contributions of Muslim thinkers, scientis Islam has been one of the most powerful religious, social and political forces in history. Yet many of the contributions of Muslim thinkers, scientists and theologians, not to mention rulers, statesmen and soldiers, have been occluded.

This book rescues from oblivion and neglect some of these personalities and institutions while offering the reader a new narrative of this lost Islamic history. The Umayyads, Abbasids, and Ottomans feature in the story, as do Muslim Spain, the savannah kingdoms of West Africa and the Mughal Empire, along with the later European colonization of Muslim lands and the development of modern nation-states in the Muslim world.

Throughout, the impact of Islamic belief on scientific advancement, social structures, and cultural development is given due prominence, and the text is complemented by portraits of key personalities, inventions and little known historical nuggets. The history of Islam and of the world's Muslims brings together diverse peoples, geographies and states, all interwoven into one narrative that begins with Muhammad and continues to this day.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. More Details Other Editions 9. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Lost Islamic History , please sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order.

Feb 14, Bilqis rated it it was amazing Shelves: must-read , science , history , favourite. Such rich Islamic history I was never aware of, I am grateful to the author and the publishers for this book of knowledge.

Others should read it as well it's an great eye opener. I nearly cried at the end of the Andalusian era. May 22, Roberto Macias rated it it was amazing. All have been very enlightening both on the rise and fall of the middle eastern empires, and understanding the conflicts that now plague the region.

It encompasses all Islamic culture by avoiding 19th century definitions of identity ethnicity and nationalism and resorting to more period, or subject, accurate descriptions, After going through Paul Johnson's "History of Christianity" and "History of the Jews" I read a few books on the Arabs. It encompasses all Islamic culture by avoiding 19th century definitions of identity ethnicity and nationalism and resorting to more period, or subject, accurate descriptions, when identity was more closely related to religion.

This has been particularly truth of the Islamic faith, and we ignore it at our own risk. By taking this approach, Firas Alkhateeb takes more time in explaining the fate of Muslims in al-Andalus, and in the Indiand subcontinent. He also spends some time going over the reasons for the success of the Muslim empires, specially acknowledging their contribution to the start of the renaissance. This book is a fantastic lesson in history without being burdensome.

I definitely recommend it to anyone who wishes to know more about world history. View 1 comment. Aug 22, Hina rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , non-fiction , religion. What an amazing amazing read! This should be made part of every school course! The writing is precise just giving enough information to know the events but not overly detailed so people end up getting bored. I know because I am not much into history and stuff. I love how the events are connected from the time of the Prophet to the 'modern' world today.

Ottoman rule intrigued me the most.. One thing is clear though as long as the rulers and people followed the teaching What an amazing amazing read!

One thing is clear though as long as the rulers and people followed the teachings of Islam they saw massive successes in every field but when they indulged in selfish gains and petty politics it ended in chaos for them and their people. A must must read.. Highly recommended! Jan 31, Y. Zardari rated it did not like it. I usually try to be measured, deliberate, and even kind in my review of a book. This is a chauvinistic, nationalist summation of Muslim history, which suffers from epistemic fallacies, and poor scholarship.

It is essentially Muslim propaganda, and bad even at that. The book attempts to counter the inferiority many feel to the West by focusing on the material and scientific accomplishments of past Muslim civilizations. Of cours I usually try to be measured, deliberate, and even kind in my review of a book. The same holds true for the modern West, or the many successful societies throughout history — the principles they adhered to are what make them distinct, and what is responsible for their material achievements.

However, are their greatest achievements then not the principles themselves? But what does it mean when societies that are not Islamic are materially successful, and when societies that are Islamic, are not? Evidently, this is not good. Hence the author attempts to convince the reader that the positive material trends in Muslim society all came from religiosity, while the negative all came from their reversal. Towards this end, the author writes lengthy listicles noting different scientific achievements of Muslim society, and appropriates a few from others along the way.

One should ask, are long lists the best way to communicate a Muslim harmony with, and contribution to scientific literature? And what also is the implication for Muslim society when some of the items the author claims Muslims to have invented, like the decimal system's number zero, are by common knowledge known to have been invented by others? The second question raises many more significant points. Secondly, the fact that he got this simple matter wrong implies he is either willfully twisting history more on that later , or lacks any factual rigor more on that later.

Material success is obviously important for a society. The failure of one classical civilization simply gave rise to the next. All good things must come to an end, but from its ashes often arises something new and as beautiful, if not more.

In the end, the Mongols conquered and captured more intensely than any civilization before it — does that mean they were a better society?

Many of the successes that the author lists are products of thinkers and ideologies that are viewed as heretical today, like the Mutazila. Does that mean that Islam is in fact the problem? This failure of the author to appropriately establish the rise and fall of civilization plays into some Arab-centrism as well.

The Abbasids existed for hundreds of years, but relatively early into that reign their existence became purely nominal in nature. The author attributes everything during this period to the Arab rule of the Abbasids, yet in fact many different dynasties and empires arose that operated autonomously, and were led by different ethnicities.

If you want to discuss scientific advancements during the so-called Golden Age, it is for example, impossible not to mention the Persians, who are not Arabs. The effective splitting up of empires within a nominal Muslim umbrella allowed for the rise and fall of empire to occur naturally while maintaining cohesive unity, and demonstrates how real Muslim societies could operate, rather than the caliphate utopia that this book essentially puts forward in its place.

The book continues to get worse by taking the traditional nationalist propaganda route of victimhood, the reductive and convenient other, and more bad scholarship. The discussion of the Fatimids is laughable. And if that group has negative views of others, it is okay to essentially say as much, without compromising the truth. But later on, the author mentions that the Abbasid seat of the Caliphate is effectively run by the Buyids, a Persian dynasty.

What he fails to mention at this time, however, is that the Buyids are in fact a Shia dynasty. If Sunni-Shia conflict is so inevitable, and Shias are sooo evil, how is that they are, without catastrophic war, running the seat of the Sunni Caliphate???

Evidently, this a serious problem for the narrative he has crafted, and so he decides to leave it out. This review is becoming very large, but still there tons of things I can discuss. The author mentions the House of Wisdom, his convenient center to the Golden Age, but it is questionable if it was ever so important. There are more characters for which could be said the same.

It was an interesting and non-normative choice to use Aurangzeb as the dividing line for the Mughals in the way he did usually its Akbar, and Aurangzeb is often blamed for their downfall, which is very debatable. Unfortunately, I doubt the author did it on any historical basis, but simply made an ideological choice.

Lost Islamic History pdf

The book is available in pdf format wh. Throughout Islamic history, one of the uniting aspects of the Muslim world was the caliphate. His job as a leader combined political power over the Muslim state as well as spiritual guidance for Muslims. The reader will probably agree with this approach in the end. This move became a crucial event in the history of Islam and came to be known as Hijra.

Lost Islamic History by Firas Alkhateeb pdf free download is a historical book. Actually, in this book, the writer has narrated the tremendous Islamic history. It was a glorious era for Muslims for years. The Arabs culture converted into Islamic culture. Islamic economy, culture, and civilization ruled the world. In fact, the true leader prophet Muhammad taught the world ethics and characterization, and these were the fundamentals of Islamic civilization.

Lost Islamic History Books

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Firas Alkhateeb – Lost Islamic History

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1 comments

  • Shelley T. 28.06.2021 at 16:03

    This revised edition includes a new chapter on the Islamic sciences, detailing the origins and development of the schools of Islamic law, theology, and spirituality.

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